Qualifying For SSI and SSDI Disability

If you are disabled and can’t work, there are numerous programs and assistance to help you.  Two of those programs at the federal level are Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).  Although there are several differences between the SSI and SSDI disability programs, there is one similarity.  The definition of disability is the same and medical disability is assessed the same way under both programs.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is the disability program for those individuals that have not worked or have not worked enough recently to be insured for benefits. It pays monthly cash benefits to people who are age 65 or older, those who are blind, or those who have a disability and have $2,000 or less in assets and have no or limited income. Both adults and children can apply for SSI.

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Evaluating Functional Equivalence In Childhood Disability

In children’s disability cases, if the child’s impairment is not severe enough to meet a Social Security “listing”, meaning an approval for disability benefits, then an assessment must be done to determine if the impairment functionally equals a listing.  For functional equivalence, the child must have one “extreme” or two “marked” limitations in the six domains of functioning. 

The six domains of functioning are:

  1. Acquiring and using information
  2. Attending and completing tasks
  3. Interacting and relating with others
  4. Moving about and manipulating objects
  5. Caring for oneself, and
  6. Health and physical well-being.

The evaluation of how functioning is affected will be done during all of the child’s activities; meaning activities done at home, at school, and in the community.   First, Social Security will identify which of the child’s activities are limited, and which domains are involved in those activities.  They will then determine whether the child’s impairment(s) could affect those domains and account for the limitations.  Second, Social Security will then rate the severity of the limitations in each affected domain(s).  If SSA finds one extreme limitation, or two marked limitations, the child will be approved for disability benefits.

Protecting Assets From The Costs of Long Term Care

WHEN IS THE RIGHT TIME TO BEGIN PLANNING?

As everyones financial and medical backgrounds are different, so is the “right” time to begin planning.  The more time you have to plan before long term care is needed, the more options you may have and less stress you and your family will endure.  Anytime you have a concern about how you will pay for long term care for yourself or a loved one, it  may be time to begin the planning process.  Preemptive planning will give you peace of mind and allow you to:

  • Analyze your financial background
  • Ensure your legal documents are up to date and distribute your estate as you wish
  • Make sure the distribution of your estate will not jeopardize public benefits for others
  • Discuss options to allow loved ones to remain at home instead of a nursing home
  • Take steps to protect and preserve your assets, including your home
  • Research all community benefits programs applicable to your situation
  • Designate agents to make medical and financial decisions for you in the event you are unable to make decisions for yourself

Long term care, incapacity and death are not subjects we are comfortable discussing.  The earlier and more comprehensive we plan, the less stress our families will be faced with in the event uncomfortable decisions need to be made.

Use Care When Planning For Special Needs Children

Being a parent comes with great joy but significant responsibility.  It is no different for parents of children with special needs. In some situations, careful planning can be critical to address a family’s financial needs.  Parents must not only plan to care for their children during their lives, but they must also take steps to ensure they have a plan in place if their child is not able to support or care for themselves when they are gone.  When is the right time to plan?  It is never too early to begin to plan for your child’s care.  As housing and work options may be limited when persons with disabilities reach the age of majority, financial planning must be addressed to ensure there are assets available to cover the long term costs to care for your child. 

COMMON MISTAKES

  • If your child is receiving government benefits, naming your child as a direct beneficiary may disqualify them for needed benefits
  • Disinheriting your child, or directing your special needs child’s inheritance to another family member with the understanding the money will be used to care for your child should be considered with exreme caution.  A lawsuit, divorce, or bankruptcy would subject the assets earmarked for the care of your child to great risk
  • Failing to name a dedicated trustee that will be involved in the life of the child. Naming a trustee to merely distribute the assets, and have no other involvement in the child’s life, may not be the best option

One effective planning tool is the use of a special needs trust.  A special needs trust holds assets earmarked for the costs of caring for your special needs child and distribute those assets for the benefit of your child without jeopardizing eligibility for government benefits.  A comprehensive and often reviewed estate plan will ensure that your special needs child is cared for when you are no longer able to.

Review Finds Nursing Home Quality Varies By Region

A recent review by the Associated Press found that the quality of nursing homes across the country varies widely by region.  Data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found that better care is often found in areas with higher income levels.  Massachusetts is no different, as statistics revealed that nursing homes in wealthier counties across the Commonwealth ranked higher than nursing homes in counties with lower incomes.  Read Full Article

For assistance with finding the right nursing home in your area, USA Today offers a search tool to help you find a facility that fits your needs.  It rates facilities based on three factors; health inspections, quality of patient care and staffing.  This tool allows you to search by entering the name of the facility, or by searching for facilities in your city and State.  Search Here