Breakthrough In Down Syndrome Research at UMass Medical

I read a very interesting article recently on the UMass Medical School website regarding Down Syndrome research.  Scientists at UMass have found a way to block or neutralize the extra chromosome that causes developmental problems and intellectual disabilities in people with Down Syndrome.   The discovery “may one day help establish potential therapeutic targets for future therapies.”  To read the entire article, see the UMass website.  Please  refer to Nature to read the details of the study.

Am I Eligible For Social Security Disability – Part 3

In part 3 of our 5 part series, we are discussing the process you must go through to be approved for social security disability benefits.  We’ve already discussed the first two steps, which address working and the severity of your impairment.  In this series, we will discuss step 3 of the sequential evaluation process which addresses whether your medical condition meets or equals a listed impairment by the Social Security Administration.  The 5 step sequential evaluation process is noted below for reference:

  1. Are you currently working?  Does your impairment prevent you from performing substantial gainful activity?
  2. Is your condition severe?
  3. Does your medical condition meet or equal a listed impairment?
  4. Can you perform your past work?
  5. Can you do any other type of work?

Step 3

Quite simply, if your condition meets or equals a listed impairment, you will be awarded benefits.  So if your condition is not on the list, does that mean you will be denied?  Not necessarily.  If  your medical condition does not meet or equal one of the listed impairments, it means you must be evaluated under steps 4 and 5 to be awarded benefits.  Steps 4 and 5 address your prior work history and whether you could potentially transition to other types of work if applicable.

In the next series, we will discuss step 4, “Can you perform past work?”

Financial Planning For Families With Special Needs

ESSENTIAL STEPS TO ACCOMPLISH YOUR GOAL

  • Start Early and Get Help –  Lack of planning may have disastrous consequences.  Planning for special needs families often involves several  financial, legal and benefits-related strategies.  Assembling a team of qualified professionals to advise you will take time.  A financial advisor, estate planning attorney, benefits coordinator, trustee/trust company, family physician/registered nurse, and of course family members may all need to be involved in the ultimate plan.
  • Establish a Special Needs Trust – If you’re receiving government sponsored benefits, a gift or inheritance may cause a disqualification of those benefits.  A frequently asked question  is how to provide for a family member with special needs without jeopardizing those government benefits.  Parents may purchase life insurance to be paid out to a special needs trust.  They may also designate the special needs trust as a beneficiary in a will, trust or retirement account.  The funds designated to the special needs trust at death may be used to supplement the special needs family member without jeopardizing their benefits.
  • Draft a Letter of Intent – How can you be assured that proper care will be given to your child? You’ve established a special needs trust  to provide financial assistance when you’re gone, but have you named  a person that will assume the role of guardian or caregiver?  Do they know the name and address of your child’s physician?  Do they know their therapies, procedure and medication schedule?  Do they know their faith and where they attend religious services?  Answers to these and many other questions should be discussed and memorialized to ensure the best possible care for your child.
  • Consider Life Insurance – Someone, most likely a family member, will have to step in to act as a guardian and raise your child.  In all likelihood, that family member will have to pay for some of the services the parents had provided when able.  If the estate was not large enough, life insurance can provide the needed funds to help defray the cost of care.
  • Review Often – Many changes will occur during the course of your life.  Reviewing your plan annually will ensure everything is up to date to give you the peace of mind your family is taken care of.